Happy, Happy, Happy?

Happiology

 

Positivity Isn’t HAPPY, HAPPY, HAPPY

You can be sad and be positive.
You can be frustrated and be positive.
You can be angry and be positive.
You can be uncertain and be positive.

Being happy is only one expression of being positive.

But being positive is a perspective, it’s a way of being, it’s a big part of your real nature. Being positive is the upward direction of energy and intention when you are in the process of expressing the end result. It is how you choose to be while you’re on the journey from one place to a better place. It is the bias of the very nature and structure of your brain.

Positivity is more like faith or being steadfast in what you believe, even when what you believe is changing or shaking.

Positivity is knowing that when one door closes, another door opens.

Positivity is moving forward and not giving in to despair and despondency.

It is refusing self-doubt and holding on the anchors in your life.

We cannot always be happy, happy, happy.

Positivity isn’t “happiology.”

But the inner anchors are there to find the meanings that sustain us through all of the stages of our lives, and even through the transitions.

© Dr. William K. Larkin 

 

About the author

Dr. William K. Larkin
  • Dr. gloria wright

    Seems to me there is plastic happy and there is real happy. The same could be true for all emotional and thought spaces. You can be real and authentic or you can be playing a role and putting on the face, but your face and your insides may not be congruent.

    Being positive can be real or pretend or plastic. For us to gain the benefits of being positive, we must be real. I love that Dr. Larkin is reiterating that we can experience a wide range of emotions – and still be positive.

    When my son was young, he had a Bozo the Clown. He was about five feet tall and filled with sand in the bottom. You could punch him over and he would come back up. Having and engaging in a positive perspective is like Bozo. You may have temporary struggles, confusion and doubt, but your energy and intention will lead you back to your strong and reliable positive frame.

    A colleague was once asked to observe six year old twins who were visiting his horse farm. One was a pessimist and one was an optimist. He followed the youngsters to the barn and watched as they explored. In the a while, the boy was crying and trying to get the manure off his shoes and getting more and more frustrated. His sister was eagerly digging in the manure in the stalls and laughing as she continued to dig.

    My friend asked each of the twins what was going on. The little boy, still crying, said, “I hate this yucky stuff. I got it all over my new shoes and clothes and can’t get it off. And it stinks.” His sister smiled at my psychologist friend, cocked her head to one side, and gleefully said simply, “I know there is a pony in here somewhere!” Atta, girl, you keep believing and looking for the pony!!!!

  • BAM

    I like the idea of thinking of positivity as a core belief, something deep rooted in who we are. I like that this belief can grow. Bad things can happen in our lives but our core belief will help us direct our reaction to what life throws at us.

Copyright © 2015 The Applied Neuroscience Institute